ME and Ophelia

Tuesday, September 27, 2005

 
WORLD'S TOP THINKERS
Are mostly aged 50 - 80++

From Normblog:
Following their poll on Britain's top public intellectuals, and to mark their tenth anniversary, Prospect magazine, in conjunction with Foreign Policy, are now going for the world's top thinkers. Readers are being asked to vote for five from a list of 100 such - as well as for one name they think has been unfairly overlooked.

The list. All human life is there: Alain Finkielkraut, J├╝rgen Habermas, Eric Hobsbawm, Naomi Klein, Martha Nussbaum, Richard Rorty, Peter Singer, Michael Walzer - and 92 other people.
[It is encouraging to see most of the people listed are aged over 50 with many in their 70's and high 80's]
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Harvard to allow military recruiters on campus

Reversing a decision made last year, Harvard Law School will fully cooperate with Pentagon recruiters this fall as it awaits a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on requiring schools to open their doors to the military.

See MSNBC Harvard to allow military recruiters on campus.
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Viral technology will be a key competency for Africans

Excerpt from Africa Blogging, a commentary on the emergence of social software and hypernetworking technology in Africa:

"Experts predict that the 21st Century will be Africa's Century."

East Africa - Computer education in secondary schools in remote areas

Photo: East Africa - Computer education in secondary schools in remote areas (via Africa Blogging)
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Considering Africa

From American blogger Steve Nicholson [newly arrived in Africa] Sept 22, 2005:

African landline phones, 2003: 25 million

African cell phone subscribers, 2003: 52 million

Personal computers in Sub-Saharan Africa, 2003: 12 per 1,000 people

Percent of population with access to improved drinking water: Sub-Saharan Africa - 82 urban, 45 rural

Infant mortality rates (birth to one year old): Sub-Saharan Africa - 102 of 1,000 children

Average life expectancy: Sub-Saharan Africa - 46 years

Poorest nations: Burundi, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Somalia - per captia GDPs of $600

Richest nation: Mauritius - per capita GDP of $12,800
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US ROUTE 66
The world is not small

As most of my life seemed like it was on the move, some people say I am well travelled. Many of the countries I have visited, I have lived in. During 15 years of living in the US, I had travelled the whole of Route 66 by car, six times. One trip took 90 hours non-stop coast to coast. If I recall right, it took 20 hours to drive through the State of Texas mostly with just dust in sight.

Recently, I visited World66 and created maps of my travels. But going by the maps I created, I have visited 18 countries, amounting to only 8% of the world, and visited 27 states which is 52% of the United States.

Short visits to a country are nothing like living there and getting to know locals and customs. Visitors to America who spend two weeks holiday in Florida, return home with little understanding of America's vastness and diversity.

World Map
I have visited 18 countries (8%) and in the US 27 states (52%)

[With thanks to Bob Piper]
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THE GREAT BLOGOSPHERE
UN Secretary General Poll

Click here for some amusing suggestions and comments.

[via Captain Marlow with thanks]

# posted by Ingrid J. Jones @ 9/27/2005
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